In the Garden: Hints From A Mrs Gardener

39

Mid-September Gardening

Submitted by Joan Regan

Mid-September, getting ready for the long winters nap. I got a message from a Gal who wanted to know what to do with an overgrown large container as well as a large Hosta she wanted to split. I was just in the middle of doing the same, so here is what works for me. 

My extra large containers I will tip on to their sides and press down gently all around to loosen them up – hopefully that works. If they don’t come out then I will get my gardening knife and cut into them separating just one side at a time, then when it is out, the other side is next. I have a small pitchfork (hand held one) that is great for this job. The plants do get in the way, so I simply wrap an old towel around them and they behave themselves. Having taken out 1/3 -1/2 of the plant there is now room for the original plant to spread out again. 

The ones I cut out will get planted in another garden or in a large container. With these, I loosen up their roots a bit and put them in a pail of water for a couple of hours, or overnight, just enough to cover the roots to hydrate them before planting. This method has worked so well for me lately – I just did it with a huge clump of daisies as well. 

The big Hosta in the garden is split the same way – after deciding how much to take, I put a towel around what is staying and then start to cut out the chunk to come out. It is a cut, dig, cut, dig, till it decides to cooperate. I will usually do this on both sides to even out the look, so she does not look hacked. Now is a good time to work in some compost around the exposed roots before covering them up again. 

I hope these suggestions help you out Marilyn. Good Luck.

Tomato cages are a huge help when transplanting. I cut them into three sections, small, medium and large, leaving their legs on. These can be gently put over the new plants to keep them upright till they adjust to their new homes. I push them into the ground just enough to secure them and they will come off easy in a few days, or maybe weeks (I left them full size for the daisies). Now the newly planted don’t have to worry about flopping over and they can concentrate on getting adjusted to their new home.

Well, I have two large Hostas hydrating in extra large trugs and it’s going to rain… so they wait. Thankful they are so tough.

Happy September, Happy Gardening,

Joni 

jpregan@amtelecom.net 519 596 2389

Saw this and it made me laugh: “Like plants too much? You might just be a Hoarderculterist.”