New 12-Acre Purchase at Driftwood Cove Will Bring BPNP Closer to Completion

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News Release

Canada’s natural landscapes inspire pride from coast to coast to coast. Nature is important not only to our cultural identity, but also to our health and our communities. That’s why the Government of Canada is doubling the amount of nature protected in Canada’s lands and oceans by 2020.
Today, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Catherine McKenna, announced that the Government of Canada has reached an agreement to acquire a 12-acre property with 500 metres of pristine Georgian Bay shoreline surrounded by Driftwood Cove, which will be part of Bruce Peninsula National Park.
Bruce Peninsula National Park is now 90 per cent complete and is one of the largest protected areas in Southern Ontario. This property was a critical piece in the completion of the park. Its acquisition will contribute to preserving the ecological integrity of the park, including the recovery of species at risk like the Massasauga rattlesnake and some of the oldest trees in eastern North America.
Through Budget 2018, the Government of Canada is investing more than $1.3 billion to protect our nature, parks, and wild spaces, helping Canada double the amount of nature protected in its lands and oceans, and help the wildlife that call them home.
“Canada is doubling the amount of nature protected in our country’s lands and oceans to help recover species at risk, fight climate change, and provide Canadians with the opportunity to discover the immense richness of our nature. Bruce Peninsula National Park is home to many endangered species, offers spectacular views of Georgian Bay, and holds cultural significance to local Indigenous peoples. This acquisition will bring Bruce Peninsula National Park closer to completion and establishes a legacy for our children and grandchildren.” The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada
Quick Facts
· Parks Canada reached an agreement with a private seller to purchase the property, which is undeveloped forest and is fully surrounded by the 3,272-acre Driftwood Cove property that the Government of Canada acquired in 2018.
· The property has no built infrastructure, and is fully forested, including old-growth cliff-edge Niagara Escarpment forest ecosystem. A section of the world famous Bruce Trail crosses through these lands.
· Since the establishment of Bruce Peninsula National Park in 1987, Parks Canada has added over 150 parcels of land, acquired on a willing seller-willing buyer basis.
· On November 30, 2018, the Government of Canada officially took ownership of the Driftwood Cove property, growing the size of Bruce Peninsula National Park by 3,272 acres and bringing the park to 90 per cent complete.
· Located within four hours of several major cities, Bruce Peninsula National Park provides opportunities for many urban and new Canadians to discover and connect with nature. For those interested in experiencing Bruce Peninsula, particularly the iconic Grotto, Parks Canada’s website makes trip planning easier – https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/on/bruce/activ/experiences/grotto.